Kinder Morgan, Site C, Canadian Mining another week of resistance

There is a connection between the many battles that so many people who live in this land we call British Columbia.  Our home on stolen land, First Nations Land. In the Vancouver Area it is the home of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Watuth Nations.

Throughout the territory recognized widely as British Columbia where resource extraction has been the mainstay of this region’s wealth,  countless numbers of Indigenous communities have been resisting extraction without consent or return for centuries.

Today more than ever, people who identify as settlers, many of whom have benefitted from being part of settler communities are standing up and acknowledging what was so long-ignored.  Now, more and more so, the resistance is spreading lead primarily by Indigenous communities — those who live on land begrudgingly given to them through Treaties then ruthlessly trampled for the purpose of extracting what to capitalists has been the basis of their wealth. As well leadership has come from members of Indigenous Communities who live away from their land in urban centres, often in poverty.

On Monday night, May 7 the Canadian Mining Community was celebrating the destruction they have wrought all over the world.  They were celebrating each other in self-congratulating award ceremonies.

At the same time a group of activists also gathered to celebrate.  They did so outside the glass palaces of luxury at what is known as Canada Place to celebrate those who have been resisting Canadian Mines, many head-officed right here in Vancouver. From the fight at Mount Polley, described in an article by Emma Gilchrist in the January issue of DeSmog Canada in the following terms:

On August 4th, 2014 a four square kilometre sized tailings pond full of toxic copper and gold mining waste breached, spilling an estimated 25 billion litres of contaminated materials into Polley Lake, Hazeltine Creek and Quesnel Lake, a source of drinking water and major spawning grounds for sockeye salmon.

Despite the fact that Mount Polley is according to a headline in the same well-researched online publication, “one of the largest environmental disasters in Canadian history — no charges have been laid against the company,” DeSmog Full story deSmogCanada

In a serious, but light hearted event, opened with words by Tsleil-Watuth watch house co-ordinator Will George who made the connections between to Kinder Morgan on burnaby Mountain and the destruction taking place in BC and around the world brought about May 9 another Kinder work day haltedby these mining companies.

The songs of welcome by Indigenous matriarchs set the tone for the gala entitled: Unearthing Mining Justice . Whether in the Phillipines, Guatemala, Mexico,  or Tibet to name a few places that were called out during this first gala of its kind in BC.more…more about mining justice

Site C every Friday at David Eby’s office

site-c-is-a-sour-deal.jpg2909 W Broadway, Vancouver

Lemonade, cookies and information about the disaster taking place in North Eastern BC.  It is amazing how little real information people living in the Lower Mainland have about the disaster that continues to unfold.  Ken and Arlene Boon are farmers from the Peace River who have fought passionately to stop this dam from going ahead.  Along with various Indigenous Communities who have been hurt by the non-stop destruction of fishing, hunting and farming land.  Currently two court cases are pending. One brought about by the Prophet River Band and the other by the Blueberry River Band.  Follow Ken and Arlene Boone at pvla@xplornet.com and Witness for the Peace.Photo 1 Peace River Valley- Photo by Robin

Wednesday, May 9 a hose down for Kinder Morgan

In Burnaby, activists — both Indigenous and Settler stopped entry to all the gates including the waters of Burrard Inlet where Liam and his kayaking pals managed to hook themselves up to the fence stopping Kinder Morgan from gaining access.  The private KM security force known as the RCMP took a few hours to get out there to detach and arrest the brave young ones who are putting their time on the line.  Meanwhile in a Kinder Morgan boardroom in Texas,  USA  two Indigenous Chiefs  Judy Wilson of the Neskonlith Indian Band, and Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Sacred Trust travelled to Texas to meet with shareholders at the meeting Wednesday. The Chiefs succeeded in having a resolution passed that demands that KM ensure more environmental accountability.

The week had started, of course, with the Greenpeace action to halt the transportation of the giant drill that Kinder Morgan brought to BC for the purpose of drilling through Burnaby Mountain.

Greenpeace halt monster drillThanks to the The National Observer   and DeSmogCanada

Https://witnessforthepeace.ca/speakout

The new Fight C website https://witnessforthepeace.ca has recently been established by the Vancouver group working tirelessly with First Nations — specifically the Prophet River and Blueberry First Nations — and the Peace Valley Landowners Association in the hopes of bringing the BCNDP/Green Coalition to its senses with regard to stopping the Site C Dam.

The resistance to this dam has been going on for almost 30 years.  Until the BC Liberals pushed forward with work on a new dam slated to flood another 140 km of prime agricultural land the battle was almost won.

The BC NDP, in opposition for many of those years expressed contempt for the Liberal government’s decision to push forward with Site C.  John Horgan, Michelle Mungall and other members of the current government even bought $100 stakes to support the fight to stop Site C.

Yet shortly after forming government the NDP and their partners despite being in a very tenuous position in the BC Legislature and against the advice of hundreds of scientists, economists, and importantly Treaty 8 First Nations and farmers who live and work in the Peace River Valley.

Ben Nelms photo of Peace River FarmlandLike many others who live in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia I’ve never been to the Peace River Valley.  I knew nothing of the people who have lived in the area for hundreds if not thousands of years.  People in my own family went to work on the first damming of the Peace River known as the W.A.C. Bennett Dam after the B.C. Premier who promoted the dam.  No consideration was given to the people whose lands were flooded to create the first dam.  Not until 50 years later when in 2017 BC Hydro apologized for the pain and harm brought about by the dam’s construction.  But that did not stop BC Hydro or the newly minted coalition government from proceeding with a new dam, the Site C despite strong arguments that it will destroy farm more than it will create well being.

The witnessforthepeace.ca . website is up-and-running and asking you to take the following pledge:

“I want Canada and BC to honour their Treaty obligations and respect the rights of Indigenous peoples. I will follow the West Moberly and Prophet River First Nation court case to protect the Peace River Valley and speak out whenever the federal and provincial governments dishonour their obligations or disrespect the rights of Indigenous peoples.     We are all Treaty people.”

Check out the facebook pages for the Peace Valley Landowners Association.  They’ve been fighting against the destruction of this land for a long time and could use help in paying off the debts accumulated in their work in preparation for the BC Utilities Commission Report.  This was the report that the NDP promised to take seriously before and during the election, then abandoned when they approved going ahead with Site C.

Take a look too at the facebook page for the Peace Valley Environmental Association

Stop Site C

Watch for the recently published book that gives you the full story of one of the most important river valleys in British Columbia and in Canada.  Breaching the Peace: The Site C Dam and a Valley’s Stand Against Big Hydro (UBCPress, Spring 2018). by Sarah Cox, an award winning journalist.

I also recommend the online publication DeSmog Canada  although the publication name will be changing in the near future.

Muskrat Falls in Newfoundland, Keeyask Dam in Manitoba and Site C  all follow the devastating and destructive path of the James Bay Power project.  The billions of dollars being spent on these massive projects of destruction have done little to promote truly green energy for Canada.  They have all proceeded over the objections of peoples who have lived on this land for thousands of years.

There is much to answer for.

If you are in Vancouver on any given Friday afternoon join the water protectors at the office  BC Attorney General, David Eby.  12 til’ 2 every friday.  Its at 2909 W Broadway, Vancouver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courage my friends….People of Faith on the Mountain, April 29, 2018

Supported by many volunteers providing food, coffee, warmth and encouragement, more than 100 people of faith from various churches and organizations came to the mountain to show support for the Keepers of truth, water watchers and those who are camped there every day.  The resistance is growing!people of faith arrested on April 29Stop Kinder Morgan.jpg

Environmental Justice As Liberation: No Consent, No Pipeline, No Kinder Morgan

The headline above is for a piece posted by 

As someone whose SFU Masters Thesis focused on the importance of creativity in resistance I find it exciting and hopeful to see the  Carnival playing out right here, in British Columbia. People’s resistance taking place in so many venues — Indigenous rights and consent, housing affordability and availability throughout the province, pipelines, fracking, massive hydro power dams, fish farms and more.  British Columbians and Canadians right across the country are speaking up and doing so with creativity.

In the Lower Mainland of British Columbia the battle to stop the Kinder Morgan Pipeline is heating up.  This piece by Sarah Beuhler gives an excellent overview of the strategy involved in mobilizing and fighting this project.

Stop KM
Burnaby Mountain, April, 2018

Against the power of governments who were falsely elected on the basis of new, community driven strategies with collusion from corporate driven mainstream media,  the Kinder Morgan pipeline battle in BC, as well as the Fight against Site C and ocean-based fish farms and fracking are  examples of  mobilizations  to protect land and water and the beings who depend on them. They are led by Indigenous leaders from the BC Union of Indian Chiefs to hundreds of small communities whose lives and livelihoods are historically and legally tied to the unceded territories. And settlers are following — finally.

Across Canada, in North and South America and throughout the colonized world, Indigenous Communities are fighting back with vigour and great creativity and are being joined by thousands, millions of settler communities who have learned to respect and understand that without the full and prior consent of the Indigenous in traditional territories , the land’s truth keepers —  sustainable progress will not ensue.

Sarah’s piece invites the public to understand the story of the Kinder Morgan Pipeline currently in an expansion mode that could increase the flow of Bitumen by 7 times what is currently transported via pipeline from Alberta.

It would then be loaded onto huge tankers 7 per week and carted off to who knows where.  Bitumen is described in Cambridge English dictionary as  “a black viscous mixture of hydrocarbons obtained naturally or as a residue from petroleum distillation. It is used for road surfacing and roofing.” Thin that out for easy flow with toxic chemicals and imagine what is travelling through the mountains across the lands, under the rivers and under the inlet and could increase to the point of danger.

Sarah’s Coast Protector story is the full story of the project and the strategies that have been developed, used, set aside and re-considered.

I hope you find it as instructive as I did.  As for the Carnival, think of the massive strategically organized resistance against the Dakota Pipeline, of the thousands of actions organized by Indigenous people against Canadian and other mining companies in their territories and the demands to stop massive dams, stop polluting rivers, stop exploiting for profit without thought of human survival. Think of all the tiny houses being built along the Trans Mountain Pipeline route, think of the years and years of protests ongoing against the Site C Dam. The songs, performances, cyber actions,  public arrests, the displays of respectful resistance are all marks of the carnival.

In my brief look at carnival I examined resistance against a backdrop of social and political movements whose histories were linked to the carnival through their disdain for power from above and their creative means of subverting that power.

At Kinder Morgan, Site C and throughout the world of resistance, let the carnival continue with thanks.

 

THE SOUTH LAWN (click here to read Sarah’s piece) 

Watchouse
The Watch House

 

Continue reading “Environmental Justice As Liberation: No Consent, No Pipeline, No Kinder Morgan”

Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way  

From Vancouver Moving Theatre

It’s finally happening!! After many years of listening, writing, visiting partnering communities and fundraising Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way is now ready to tour across Turtle Island/Canada.

WROW Sophie Merasty and Marge White, photo D. Cooper
Sofie Maresty and Marge White. Photo by David Cooper

And it’s starting here on Coast Salish territory at the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre May 17-27, 2018.

Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way is a new play and cultural encounter that brings to life the story of Old One and his journey to reconcile with himself, his family and his community.
Woven around indigenous storytelling and cultural teachings, Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way is co-written by award-winning artists Renae Morriseau (Saulteaux Cree) with Rosemary Georgeson (Coast Salish/Sahtu Dene) and Savannah Walling (American Canadian). It is also enriched by contributions from the cast, knowledge-keepers and partnering communities.

Vancouver Moving Theatre is  also so thrilled to announce the cast of Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way:

Sam Bob   (Snaw-Naw-As/Coast Salish)
Stephen Lytton   (Nicomen Indian Band, Nlaka’pamux First Nation)
Marge White   (Huu-ay-aht First Nation)
Tai Amy Grauman   (Metis/Iroquois Cree)
Jonathan Fisher   (Pottawattami, Wikwemikong Unceded Reserve)
Sophie Merasty   (Dene/Woodlands Cree Nations)
Latash Maurice Nahanee   (Squamish Nation)
Tracey Nepinak   (Cree/Peguis First Nation)
Tania Carter   (Salish)
Vern Bevis   (Okanagan Nation)

The cast will be joined on stage by local youth and cultural knowledge keepers from each host community on the tour. Please follow us on facebook and visit www.weaving-reconciliation-our-way.ca to find out more.

More about WROW from Vancouver Moving Theatre

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in BC Supreme Court next week: So what’s next? Ask the “rule of law” judge!

April 11, 2018, many water and coast defenders went to a first BC Supreme Court appearance for their roles in resisting the Kinder Morgan — Texas oil giant’s current BC/Albert boondoggle.

One particularly interesting observation by an arrestee was the presence of KM undercover, plain clothes security who were allowed into the courtroom otherwise denied to those who were not part of the actual proceedings.

Meanwhile across the country, the games being played between governments increased with the day while they collectively ignore the the leadership strengths and presence of BC’s Indigenous Peoples,  leaders like Grand Chief Stuart Phillips and Chief Bob Chamberlin go virtually unmentioned with focus being instead on interloper governments and ignoring sovereignty.

Thanks  go to CBC On the Coast’s Louise Elliot for a good interview with Chief Chamberlin on the topic of general First Nations leaders absence from mention in the media or among the Ministers — prime and not so prime of Alberta and BC. Unfortunately CBC The Current decided that the Vancouver Sun’sVaughn Palmer was the best journey to represent BC on the tar sands topic.  As with most mainstream journalists in BC they love to describe the polls as reflecting that most British Columbians are in favour of the KM project.  Speak up people and let your voices be heard!!!

Interesting to note that unlike the Canadian and Provincial Governments the Chiefs speak respectfully of each other — even those who have signed with KM. And that came out loud and clear in the interview.

Settler community people involved in the resistance to KM and Site C and fracking and the poisonous fish farming are learning so much from the relationships with these leaders, matriarchs, dancers, singers, story tellers and keepers of traditional knowledge. Respect, prayer and ceremony have taken on so much more meaning to those of us who have become active resisters.

Remember this? Substitute KM … !

 

One 0f 200 arrested for taking a stand against tar-filled pipelines coming to the coast

Lmleclair_KinderMorgan_22March2018_001
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On March 22, I became the 140th person to be arrested standing at the gate to the Kinder Morgan disaster that is happening on Burnaby Mountain.  Although i’ve been involved in many and various activities during my more than 50 years as a feminist, labour and cultural activist, I’ve never been arrested before.

Tomorrow about 170 of us have been summoned to court to find out how the system will deal with our refusal to accept Justin Trudeau’s order to let the Texas-based Kinder Morgan proceed with completing a pipeline to transport dirty,  heavy and chemical-laden bitumen through forests and neighbourhoods to the Fraser River and beyond.

I’m proud to have taken a stand.  I will continue to do so.  I’m grateful for the leadership of the Indigenous Coast Protectors (@coastprotectors), for all the Indigenous Matriarchs and for the thousands who have stood up for First Nations rights and the rights of all people to live and breathe without being poisoned.

Thanks to Arthur Manuel for encouraging so many in the settler communities on this journey.

Lmleclair_KinderMorgan_22March2018_007

Many thanks to Ta’ah Amy George, Tsleil=Waututh Matriarch, UBCIC Grand Chief , Stuart Phillips with Naomi Klein  (@NaomiKlein) and Chief Bob Chamberln (@ChiefBobbyc). This is national and international leadership!