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Category Archives: Resistance through movements and art

The gloves come off in the fight to stop the Kinder Morgan Pipeline

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The gloves come off in the fight to stop the Kinder Morgan Pipeline

The BC Supreme Court Judge (Affleck) who, on Kinder Morgan’s request, first ordered the injunction limiting protestors to stay five metres away from the gates and waters surrounding the Burnaby Mountain Site, has ramped up the initial injunction.

As of last Friday, June 1, 2018 protestors are forbidden from getting closer than 10 metres of the gates to Kinder Morgan, must keep the roads clear, must obey all the signs and broadcasts — wherever they are claiming Kinder Morgan territory.  And if we don’t do what they say, it will be off to jail for 7 to 10 days.

Canada, get ready!

I was part of a group of 20 within the first 240 people to who under the guidance of our lawyer Chilwin Cheng, Ascendion Law, plead not-guilty.  It was a technical, but important step in attempting to clarify the confusion around civil contempt, which folks up until the end of March were charged with by the RCMP, and criminal contempt.  Judge Affleck, with the agreement of the Attorney General of BC’s office, upgraded the pre-April charges to criminal contempt.  What makes it criminal you ask!  Oh, you are in criminal contempt apparently when you disobey publicly rather than quietly, I guess, like corporate disobedience — do it quietly, I guess and they’ll be nice to you — no matter what.

Lawyer Cheng and his associates working with the group of protestors I was involved with is of the opinion that the contempt charges should be just that and that the punishment should be dictated by something more than public view especially in this day and age where the public part of your disobedience might actually be ‘beyond your control”  given all the digital media present. In addition, Chilwin argued that  violence should be considered when sentences for contempt are handed over. The group I went to court with was proven guilty and we were each given sentences of either $500 or 25 hours of community service.  My service with 411 Seniors Society has already started.

The Travesty of it All

I read an interesting editorial in The Guardian today about how Canada has become a country known for its apologies, particularly under the “teary-eyed” Justin Trudeau. Apologies without substance, of course as Canada continues to impose colonial practice on Indigenous Peoples right across the country, continues to condemn those of us who support Palestinian sovereignty.

before-after-tar-sands

Stick around

This Monday, June 11 the next wave of protests will begin.  Just to be clear, not that they have ever stopped.  Lead by our Coast Salish sisters and brothers not one day has gone by when there has not been some action, ceremony or celebration of the resistance to territorial destruction.

But on Monday a new wave will begin.  With the new boundaries for protest and proposals that fines will now be replaced by jail time the long, hot summer of 2018 is about to begin.

The Watch House for Burnaby Mountain and the Tiny Houses being built right along the line where the Justin Trudeau Pipeline is threatening to be built through Indigenous Territories both First Nations and settlers will be telling the world that it is time to stop the destruction coming from Canada’s “tar sands” — territorial home to the Lubicon Cree and other Indigenous Nations and Métis Communities who have lived in the territory for many, many, generations some, before contact,  and have been fighting against the “tar sands” project since the 1970’s.

 

 

 

 

“We Are Going to Not Allow Kinder Morgan to Finish This Pipeline”

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Louise Leclair asks:

What does Bill Morneau mean when he says that CanadiansWhales and bitumen don't mix won’t have to pay the indemnification bill for Kinder Texas Oil Giant Kinder M

Anybody want to buy a useless pipeline … or a hydro dam for that matter?

 

 

 

May 21, 2018

By  Andy Rowell  [reprinted from Portside Moderator originally from Common Dreams

 

It’s not just about the spills, it’s not just about the orcas,” said Graham Clumpner one of the paddlers with the Mosquito Fleet: “The bigger issue that we are all facing is climate change,” he said. “We are going to not allow Kinder Morgan to finish this pipeline.”

“They want to bring that oil through here, but we say that we will stop Kinder Morgan,” George-Parker said. “It is not happening.” , Emma Cassidy, Greenpeace

As the clock ticks down until the May 31 deadline over the controversial Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline project, which will triple the amount of tar sands being transported from Alberta to the British Columbian coast, the campaign against its expansion is spreading abroad.

Yesterday in Seattle, over 200 km south of where the pipeline hits the coast, hundreds of “kayactivists” took to the water to protest against the pipeline.

They were part of a demonstration by the US environmental group, Mosquito Fleet, Greenpeace US and Sierra Club that organised a rally in the city against Kinder Morgan’s proposed pipeline expansion.

Tensions are certainly rising. Kinder Morgan has given the Federal government of Canada until the end of the month to resolve outstanding financial and legal issues surrounding the pipeline. Last week, in order to appease the Texan oil company, Trudeau’s Government announced that it will effectively give the Kinder Morgan a “blank cheque” “to indemnify” the pipeline “against any financial loss,” suffered if they build the pipeline.

The move seems to have backfired and emboldened everyone fighting the pipeline. And as the May 31 deadline gets closer, there is a growing awareness not only of the threat that the pipeline poses to the climate, but also to marine life as it would massively increase the tanker traffic up the West Coast of Canada and US.

Indeed, last week the US environmental group, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), warned Kinder Morgan that the pipeline project, could be “illegal” under the US Endangered Species Act, which is seen as one of the world’s strongest species protection laws.

“It’s not just about the spills, it’s not just about the orcas,” said Graham Clumpner one of the paddlers with the Mosquito Fleet: “The bigger issue that we are all facing is climate change,” he said. “We are going to not allow Kinder Morgan to finish this pipeline.”

Ben Smith from Greenpeace USA added “It would make climate change worse, it would trample Indigenous rights, it would run over our clean water here, and it would decimate the final 76 remaining orcas, the Southern Resident killer whale in our waters.”

At the rally yesterday, one of the speakers was Cedar George-Parker from the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, who have been leading the community opposition to the pipeline in British Columbia. “They want to bring that oil through here, but we say that we will stop Kinder Morgan,” George-Parker said. “It is not happening.”

Not only is the growing resistance from the local community, indigenous rights groups and local and US-based environmental groups to the pipeline, but even the financial community thinks the economics and changing energy market is stacked against it. Wal van Lierop is president and CEO of Chrysalix Venture Capital.

Writing in the Globe and Mailyesterday, Van Lierop pointed out what many people having been saying to Trudeau for months, but what the Canadian Prime Minister has flatly ignored: “There is also growing consensus that the world is going through an energy transition,” he wrote, before likening the current the energy transition to a baseball game, where “we could see the stages of its progression over the past decade.”

In the first inning, argues Van Lierop “coal lost to gas in the competition for power generation in North America and Europe; solar and wind lit up the scoreboard with incredible cost reductions in the second inning; but in the third, shale oil and gas rallied, creating an energy boom in U.S. gas and making that country the international swing player — supplanting OPEC in that position.”

Van Lierop adds: “Now we are entering the fourth inning, with a playing field of abundant cheap energy and midway through the ball game it looks like the players highest on the cost curve will be the ones striking out. Those players will likely include both new projects in Arctic oil and the oil sands, as their business case makes them weak in a game where cost is key.”

He even goes as far as to warn, because the pipeline makes no economic sense due to the expensive tar sands extraction and transportation costs, that “we would have to presume that the Alberta and federal governments hadn’t seen the Kinder Morgan order book before they announced an intention to financially support the company’s pipeline, because that may show a rapidly deteriorating business case.”

He is not the only one who thinks Trudeau is in trouble here. Indeed, as Bloomberg pointed out at the end of last week, “Justin Trudeau’s pipeline nightmare may be only getting started … the prime minister could end up fighting for an asset that hardly anybody wants.”

© 2018 Oil Change International And Common Dreams

Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way Vancouver, Penticton, Toronto, Winnipeg

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Cast and Crews

Cast, writers, directors, designers, producers — the whole crew of WROW

Last Thursday night the long-awaited production of Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way, a play co-written by Renae Morrisear\, Rosemary Georgeson and Savannah Walling and directed by Morriseau opened at the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre in East Vancouver/Coast Salish Territories to a circle bursting with friends and guests.

The play cum multi-media performances including  storytelling, traditional and personal songs as well as drumming and games–one game in particular Slahal–features some of the finest actors from various parts of British Columbia and across the county.

Stephen Lytton, Sophie Merasty, Jonathan Fisher and Sam Bob join Delhia Nahanee, Latash Maurice Nahanee, Tai Amy Grauman, Tracey Nepinak Vern Bevis and Tania Carter in sharing  life experiences and and the stories of how one Indigenous family’s healing process defines reconciliation.

Its not what some might expect if people are looking at the play to shed light on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s proposals about reconciling between First Nations and Canada.  Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way  (WROW)is deep and its personal. it is more about how one Indigenous family’s healing process defines reconciliation

Morisseau says this about reconciliation “As Indigenous people we have been ‘reconciling’ for a long time within our own communities and in our families. We are living with the impact that Canadian policy and legislation has had on us. It’s generational and continues today.”

And (WROW is funny.  As with many communities, sometimes you just had to be part of it to get the humour but the uproar at various parts of the play hit the heart and the funny bone of every single person in the house.

Sam Bob Slahal

And audiences in every performance since opening night have been raving.

 Here are just a few early responses: 

Amazing, amazing AMAZING.  So SO powerful.
I felt lucky to be in the room.”

Excited to experience indigeneity in this way. Please keep up the amazing work. THIS IS CANADIAN HISTORY.”

Thank you so much for this beautiful, humorous, tragic, hopeful tapestry.

Watching the play, I believed that each story represented the lived experience of each actor. The sharing of the stories, intertwined with other stories, intertwined with past injustices, intertwined with other injustices, give light to the complexities of the process of reconciliation with Indigenous families.

Awesome play. Funny, sad – the actors are great!”

The show continues in Vancouver until May 26 with performances at 7:30 each of May 24 and 25 and one performance at 2:00 pm on May 26.

Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way travels to:

Penticton/Sylix Territory  for a performance on Thursday May 31 at 7:00 pm and a Friday matinee at 12:30 pm at the En’owken Centre

Toronto/Treaty 13 on June 6-9 Wednesday through Friday 7:30 pm and Saturday manatee at 2:00 pm Aki Studio Theatre

Winnipeg/Treaty 1 and Metis Homelands June 13 -16 Wednesday through Friday 7:30 pm and Saturday matinee 2:00 pm Theatre Circle Molière

 

Don’t mss Weaving Reconciliation: Our Way!

Tomorrow i’ll post another piece on Les Filles du Roi  (the King’s Daughters) an extraordinary musical/drama about the 800 women famously sent from France to “populate” the New World between 1663 and 1673.  Staging, music and story extraordinaire.

 

Arrested: Now What? In Burnaby, they are afraid of being on the front line of dying!

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Today many people laid down in front of the Kinder Morgan gate in preparation for the “real die in” that could come should any small thing ignite that bomb that is sitting atop of Burnaby Mountain!

They were arrested for dying! Can you imagine.  So along with many others of us, no doubt, they will plead “not guilty” of doing anything wrong but protesting the fire and destruction that could follow.

Mainstream media being what it is, we hear nothing of the KM and other companies oil spills and oil leaks and what have you taking place be it in the Gulf of Mexico, the Pacific Ocean or wherever,

Remember the 70’s song, “When will we ever learn.  When will we e….ver learn!”  I guess,

 

in 2018…. it seems not quite yet!Mountain bomb!

Kinder Morgan, Site C, Canadian Mining another week of resistance

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There is a connection between the many battles that so many people who live in this land we call British Columbia.  Our home on stolen land, First Nations Land. In the Vancouver Area it is the home of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Watuth Nations.

Throughout the territory recognized widely as British Columbia where resource extraction has been the mainstay of this region’s wealth,  countless numbers of Indigenous communities have been resisting extraction without consent or return for centuries.

Today more than ever, people who identify as settlers, many of whom have benefitted from being part of settler communities are standing up and acknowledging what was so long-ignored.  Now, more and more so, the resistance is spreading lead primarily by Indigenous communities — those who live on land begrudgingly given to them through Treaties then ruthlessly trampled for the purpose of extracting what to capitalists has been the basis of their wealth. As well leadership has come from members of Indigenous Communities who live away from their land in urban centres, often in poverty.

On Monday night, May 7 the Canadian Mining Community was celebrating the destruction they have wrought all over the world.  They were celebrating each other in self-congratulating award ceremonies.

At the same time a group of activists also gathered to celebrate.  They did so outside the glass palaces of luxury at what is known as Canada Place to celebrate those who have been resisting Canadian Mines, many head-officed right here in Vancouver. From the fight at Mount Polley, described in an article by Emma Gilchrist in the January issue of DeSmog Canada in the following terms:

On August 4th, 2014 a four square kilometre sized tailings pond full of toxic copper and gold mining waste breached, spilling an estimated 25 billion litres of contaminated materials into Polley Lake, Hazeltine Creek and Quesnel Lake, a source of drinking water and major spawning grounds for sockeye salmon.

Despite the fact that Mount Polley is according to a headline in the same well-researched online publication, “one of the largest environmental disasters in Canadian history — no charges have been laid against the company,” DeSmog Full story deSmogCanada

In a serious, but light hearted event, opened with words by Tsleil-Watuth watch house co-ordinator Will George who made the connections between to Kinder Morgan on burnaby Mountain and the destruction taking place in BC and around the world brought about May 9 another Kinder work day haltedby these mining companies.

The songs of welcome by Indigenous matriarchs set the tone for the gala entitled: Unearthing Mining Justice . Whether in the Phillipines, Guatemala, Mexico,  or Tibet to name a few places that were called out during this first gala of its kind in BC.more…more about mining justice

Site C every Friday at David Eby’s office

site-c-is-a-sour-deal.jpg2909 W Broadway, Vancouver

Lemonade, cookies and information about the disaster taking place in North Eastern BC.  It is amazing how little real information people living in the Lower Mainland have about the disaster that continues to unfold.  Ken and Arlene Boon are farmers from the Peace River who have fought passionately to stop this dam from going ahead.  Along with various Indigenous Communities who have been hurt by the non-stop destruction of fishing, hunting and farming land.  Currently two court cases are pending. One brought about by the Prophet River Band and the other by the Blueberry River Band.  Follow Ken and Arlene Boone at pvla@xplornet.com and Witness for the Peace.Photo 1 Peace River Valley- Photo by Robin

Wednesday, May 9 a hose down for Kinder Morgan

In Burnaby, activists — both Indigenous and Settler stopped entry to all the gates including the waters of Burrard Inlet where Liam and his kayaking pals managed to hook themselves up to the fence stopping Kinder Morgan from gaining access.  The private KM security force known as the RCMP took a few hours to get out there to detach and arrest the brave young ones who are putting their time on the line.  Meanwhile in a Kinder Morgan boardroom in Texas,  USA  two Indigenous Chiefs  Judy Wilson of the Neskonlith Indian Band, and Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Sacred Trust travelled to Texas to meet with shareholders at the meeting Wednesday. The Chiefs succeeded in having a resolution passed that demands that KM ensure more environmental accountability.

The week had started, of course, with the Greenpeace action to halt the transportation of the giant drill that Kinder Morgan brought to BC for the purpose of drilling through Burnaby Mountain.

Greenpeace halt monster drillThanks to the The National Observer   and DeSmogCanada

Https://witnessforthepeace.ca/speakout

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Https://witnessforthepeace.ca/speakout

The new Fight C website https://witnessforthepeace.ca has recently been established by the Vancouver group working tirelessly with First Nations — specifically the Prophet River and Blueberry First Nations — and the Peace Valley Landowners Association in the hopes of bringing the BCNDP/Green Coalition to its senses with regard to stopping the Site C Dam.

The resistance to this dam has been going on for almost 30 years.  Until the BC Liberals pushed forward with work on a new dam slated to flood another 140 km of prime agricultural land the battle was almost won.

The BC NDP, in opposition for many of those years expressed contempt for the Liberal government’s decision to push forward with Site C.  John Horgan, Michelle Mungall and other members of the current government even bought $100 stakes to support the fight to stop Site C.

Yet shortly after forming government the NDP and their partners despite being in a very tenuous position in the BC Legislature and against the advice of hundreds of scientists, economists, and importantly Treaty 8 First Nations and farmers who live and work in the Peace River Valley.

Ben Nelms photo of Peace River FarmlandLike many others who live in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia I’ve never been to the Peace River Valley.  I knew nothing of the people who have lived in the area for hundreds if not thousands of years.  People in my own family went to work on the first damming of the Peace River known as the W.A.C. Bennett Dam after the B.C. Premier who promoted the dam.  No consideration was given to the people whose lands were flooded to create the first dam.  Not until 50 years later when in 2017 BC Hydro apologized for the pain and harm brought about by the dam’s construction.  But that did not stop BC Hydro or the newly minted coalition government from proceeding with a new dam, the Site C despite strong arguments that it will destroy farm more than it will create well being.

The witnessforthepeace.ca . website is up-and-running and asking you to take the following pledge:

“I want Canada and BC to honour their Treaty obligations and respect the rights of Indigenous peoples. I will follow the West Moberly and Prophet River First Nation court case to protect the Peace River Valley and speak out whenever the federal and provincial governments dishonour their obligations or disrespect the rights of Indigenous peoples.     We are all Treaty people.”

Check out the facebook pages for the Peace Valley Landowners Association.  They’ve been fighting against the destruction of this land for a long time and could use help in paying off the debts accumulated in their work in preparation for the BC Utilities Commission Report.  This was the report that the NDP promised to take seriously before and during the election, then abandoned when they approved going ahead with Site C.

Take a look too at the facebook page for the Peace Valley Environmental Association

Stop Site C

Watch for the recently published book that gives you the full story of one of the most important river valleys in British Columbia and in Canada.  Breaching the Peace: The Site C Dam and a Valley’s Stand Against Big Hydro (UBCPress, Spring 2018). by Sarah Cox, an award winning journalist.

I also recommend the online publication DeSmog Canada  although the publication name will be changing in the near future.

Muskrat Falls in Newfoundland, Keeyask Dam in Manitoba and Site C  all follow the devastating and destructive path of the James Bay Power project.  The billions of dollars being spent on these massive projects of destruction have done little to promote truly green energy for Canada.  They have all proceeded over the objections of peoples who have lived on this land for thousands of years.

There is much to answer for.

If you are in Vancouver on any given Friday afternoon join the water protectors at the office  BC Attorney General, David Eby.  12 til’ 2 every friday.  Its at 2909 W Broadway, Vancouver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courage my friends….People of Faith on the Mountain, April 29, 2018

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Supported by many volunteers providing food, coffee, warmth and encouragement, more than 100 people of faith from various churches and organizations came to the mountain to show support for the Keepers of truth, water watchers and those who are camped there every day.  The resistance is growing!people of faith arrested on April 29Stop Kinder Morgan.jpg

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